Ryan Kashubara: Efficiency to Get Ahead in Life

Ryan Kashubara is a diverse manufacturing engineer with experience working for Epic Technologies, LLC., and a Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial and Systems Engineering to his name. He has earned a reputation for efficiency, among other workplace skills, and his ability to streamline helps him get ahead in life.

 

 

Below are examples of how you can follow Ryan Kashubara’s lead and apply efficiency to get ahead in your own life:

 

 

 Schedule.

 

Technology provides a plethora of scheduling apps, programs and tools, and that’s in addition to the abundance of traditional materials. Use an efficient tool that can keep a disciplined schedule that fits for your style of work and play.

 

Control your calendar, plan for everything and even schedule time for relaxation and play. With this approach, it’s easier to make room for inevitable unexpected events.

 

 

   Organize.

 

It sounds minor, but the amount of time spent looking for things like keys, outfits, pens, day planners and phones adds up. Efficient people like Mr. Kashubara often keep everything in a designated place so that they can find what they need quickly with no extra looking.

 

 

 Time.

 

Do you know exactly how much time you spend doing different tasks each day? Most don’t, but if you time your activities for a week or a month, you’ll be surprised at how much you spend on social media, texting or taking phone calls.

 

Time yourself for a week or month straight twice a year on every activity for regular check-ins on where you need to be more efficient.

 

As you become more efficient, you should begin to see a shift in your life and even in how your employer views you, especially if you work in a challenging career like Ryan Kashubara’s. Follow Ryan Kashubara on Crunchbase: https://www.crunchbase.com/person/ryan-kashubara

 

 

Ryan Kashubara: Working as a Manufacturing Engineer

Ryan Kashubara is a manufacturing engineer with a Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial and Systems Engineering from Ohio State University. He worked with Epic Technologies, LLC., from 2011 to 2016, and is already searching for his next challenging career experience.

 

As a manufacturing engineer, Ryan Kashubara enjoys frequent opportunities for self-improvement and thought-provoking responsibilities. He has earned a reputation for his eager approach to work and his problem-solving methods, among other abilities, and looks forward to a long career in the field.

 

If you’re interested in working as a manufacturing engineer, the example below will help you get a better idea of what you’re up against:

 

  A Sample Position as a Manufacturing Engineer.

Mr. Kashubara worked with Epic Technologies, LLC., a subsidiary of NEO Tech, from 2011 to 2016. Initially, as a quality engineer, he worked with customers, managed quality control, handled inspections and created control plan and failure mode effects analysis (FMEA) documentation.

 

As a process engineer, he served as a shift leader, developed and validated assembly processes, reduced operational waste, designed cell layouts and coordinated production aspects of repair and implementation.

After accepting promotion to Lead Process Engineer for Medical Products, he worked on process improvements, performed root cause analyses, implemented tracking and data logging systems and managed assembly line qualification for transfer.

 

Though Mr. Kashubara’s work keeps him busy, he still has time for self-improvement and a variety of hobbies in his personal life.

 

 

Consider speaking with a manufacturing engineer like Ryan Kashubara in a mentorship discussion for additional insight into the career. Such a discussion can provide all of the answers that you need to make your decision on whether or not the field is right for you. 

 

Follow Ryan Kashubara on Behance: https://www.behance.net/ryankashubara

Ryan Kashubara: Quality Engineering

During his career Ryan Kashubara witnessed many businesses try and catch defective products before the products get to customers by using visual inspection. The problem with this approach is that inspections can’t change the quality of the product. They can help get rid of items that are not good enough, but they can’t decrease their amount.

 

Lean methodology approaches the subject of product creation and manufacturing in a different way. It focuses on quality and waste elimination at every step of the value stream. If issues and defects occur, the product does not leave the current step of the process. Key characteristics may be verified at the next step. The difference between lean and traditional approaches is that in lean methodology the defective product doesn’t leave the process. It is being returned to the previous step in the process. The person or team that was responsible for the step at which the defect occurred is responsible for the quality of the work. In this approach, every person becomes an inspector of quality and discovering the issues right when they occur becomes more realistic.

 

 

If you ever tried to fill out an online form that wouldn’t let you submit it before you fill out all the required fields, you have experienced quality control at the source. Lean methodology doesn’t claim that all inspections are bad. However, engineers like Ryan Kashubara know that inspection doesn’t add any value to the final product or service. 

Ryan Kashubara - Why Lean Principles Work

Ryan Kashubara has worked as an industrial engineer for years in Ohio since graduating from Ohio State University with a degree in Industrial Engineering. Ryan Kashubara has helped many different companies develop and make crucial pieces of equipment and components for many industries. Over his time working to help manufacturing become more efficient and more productive, Kashubara has found the principles of lean development and manufacturing extremely useful for increasing productivity and efficiency in the creation of products.

Ryan Kashubara based all of his process analysis and his methods of fixing processes so that manufacturing companies can create better products faster and more efficiently on the lean principle of kaizen, which is Japanese for continuous improvement. When root cause analysis and other actions get at the heart of possible inefficiencies before they can occur, continuous improvement is possible. Kashubara has worked for years to instill this principle in the manufacturing companies he has worked for in his career as an industrial engineer. Another key lean principle is quality built-in. Originally developed for software programmers, this principle commands that testing and perfecting deliverables be built into the process of creating them in the first place, eliminating the need for checkers to go back over code looking for errors.

Ryan Kashubara makes sure everyone he works with understands at least the basics of many lean principles because he knows they can help improve the throughput of all kinds of product development and creation in many different industries. He lives in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Ryan Kashubara - First Three Steps in Process Improvement​

Ryan Kashubara has been an expert in process improvement and electronic device manufacturing since he worked for Epic Technologies after graduating from Ohio State University with a BS degree in Industrial Engineering. Kashubara has developed many different manufacturing processes, some prototypes in electronic medical devices, and more. He is constantly working to improve the process of manufacturing, compliance, and quality for his employers. Here are the first three steps in typical business process improvement strategies:

  • Identify areas of improvement. Before any process can be fixed, it has to be identified as something that can be improved. It sounds easy, but in a manufacturing production chain, there could be complex issues that are difficult to identify. Ryan Kashubara has learned how to identify problem areas through several years of experience working with businesses.
  • Rethink the process. Usually, to improve a process, you have to take a large view of the problem. This can only happen if you start from the drawing board and rethink the entire process from top to bottom to find the weak link in the chain.
  • Automate. In most business practices, the only way to ensure that all of the problems are fixed permanently is to install an automatic system that keeps all of the improvements in the process intact. Now that you know the problem and where exactly it needs to be improved, you can put in systems that keep the mistakes and problems out of the equation.

Ryan Kashubara learned how to automate systems and keep all products in strict compliance with all regulations during his time with Epic Technologies.

Ryan Kashubara - Process Mapping

Ryan Kashubara has had to be very versatile in his professional life. Ever since he graduated from Ohio State University with a BS in Industrial Engineering, Ryan Kashubara has worked with many different companies, helping them improve their engineering products, specifically companies that make electronic components for all kinds of devices, including medical devices. Kashubara, in addition to working to understand how the engineering of these products work, also has to help on the business side of their production. That means he manages workers, inspects products, creates new value-added systems that are constantly improving, and sometimes completes process mapping projects.

 

Ryan Kashubara isn’t a business owner or leader in the traditional sense. With an engineering background, he started his career focusing on the products the company he worked for, Epic Technologies, and how they would work better and be produced more efficiently. Kashubara, after a time working with local factories and companies in Ohio, eventually moved into the business side of things when he started working directly with clients to ease their concerns and ensure they were getting the quality products they needed. Process mapping is the visual mapping of an entire process. It sounds simple, but when processes get more complicated, their maps become essential. Kashubara ensures that everyone understands crucial processes that go into the manufacturing of electronic devices from the top down.

 

Ryan Kashubara learned process mapping and many other business strategies such as lean manufacturing on the job, working to improve the production of electronic components and more throughout his career.

Ryan Kashubara -Why Continuous Improvement Matters

Ryan Kashubara has worked as a quality engineer and industrial engineer in Ohio for years. Ryan Kashubara worked for Epic Technologies, LLC in Norwalk, Ohio before the company was sold and he moved with one of its clients to a new factory in Mason, Ohio. Kashubara has helped factories in both of these places produce needed electronics assemblies, many of which went into the construction and development of medical devices that have helped keep people alive all over the world. Over time, Kashubara has developed a deep understanding of all lean manufacturing principles, to increase production and efficiency in all factory settings. One key principle to keep everything on track to high efficiency and higher production levels is continuous improvement. 

 

Continuous improvement requires a diligent industrial engineer like Ryan Kashubara working constantly to examine the manufacturing processes of a system. Some lean manufacturing engineers and leaders believe that continuous improvement is the most important principle in lean manufacturing and development because it constantly creates positive change for the organization. Without this positive change, a manufacturing supply chain can grow stagnant and break down over time. Continuous improvement also usually requires all employees in a system to be trained and re-trained in the basic requirements of the manufacturing process and relied upon for prime efficiency. 

 

Ryan Kashubara has worked for much of his career to instill the many processes and principles of lean manufacturing and development for his organization to improve and find new ways to increase efficiency at all times.